Category Archives: Malaysian

Step-By-Step Recipe: Spicy Dried Shrimp Rolls / Hae Bee Hiam Rolls (蝦米香)

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Chinese New Year (‘CNY’) is already in full force, and I figure that these are the three possible reactions you might have towards the picture of the Spicy Dried Prawn Rolls / Hae Bee Hiam (蝦米香) above:

1. No more, just NO MORE – They were good while they lasted but I am already harbouring a sore throat from over-consumption…
2. NO, just give me some! A handful will do, or just a couple! What is CNY without these?!
3. Excuse me, but what are these?

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TummyTroll Specials: An overseas student’s Chinese New Year

TummyTroll’s homemade prawn roll snacks (hae bee hiam)… More on this later ;)

Have you ever wondered how Singaporean students abroad celebrate Chinese New Year away from family and friends? Our celebrations might be much more toned down with barely a decoration or two, but you would be surprised at how creative many of us are when it comes to CNY! Here are some things I have noticed across most student celebrations:

1. Almost all of us use our trusty rice cookers for “steamboat” because this REALLY works very well
2. Mahjong (yes, those with the tiles) and card games always find their way into our celebrations
3. Can’t get your hands on yusheng, pineapple tarts and other festive goodies? We DIY and make them from scratch! Continue reading

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Step By Step Recipe: Singapore Fried Prawn Noodles / Hokkien Mee (福建炒虾面)

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Last week at TummyTroll we made our very own Prawn Noodle Soup from scratch: The soup stock alone took almost 2 days, and we made enough soup stock to feed more than 20 people at a party! There was still half a pot of soup stock left and that was enough reason for us to fry up some Singapore Fried Prawn Noodles, or Hokkien Mee, the next day! Although we did not manage to find the thick rice vermicelli, or bee hoon, that is more commonly used in the favourite local dish, we used the thin variety and it was still a delicious plate of noodles due to the flavourful soup stock base, fresh ingredients, and the spicy sambal chilli with a kick! All that was missing was perhaps the opeh leaf for the extra touch of authenticity, and the wok hei for that extra  oomph! Nonetheless here is the recipe to one of Singapore’s most beloved hawker dishes: Continue reading

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Step-By-Step Recipe: Penang Prawn Noodle Soup / Hae Mee (虾面汤)

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After having studied in the UK for almost two and a half years now, I still think about hawker food back home on those cold lonely days but the cravings are usually curbed after I attempt to make some dishes from scratch (think our recent Bak Chor Mee or Kaya Puffs from a little while ago). Prawn noodles, however, was something I never put myself to – It is Hae Mee (prawn noodles in the Hokkien dialect) for goodness sake! It’s not just something that can be made out of a Prima Paste packet (well you can, but it won’t quite be the same). In my heart it has a certain artisanal quality that I never thought could be recreated at home unless highly skilled and truly desperate. Hence, when TummyTroll was put to the task of making Hae Mee for a party of 20 over people, we were elated at the prospects of eating authentic prawn noodles, but also fearful: What if our prawns were not fresh enough? What if the soup turned out to be tasteless?

Well, as we have discovered, all these worries were unfounded… Clichéd as it might seem, as long as you put in sufficient hours and effort, prawn noodles, or any other seemingly arduous dish would always turn out good, as it did here! If amateur student cooks like us can make Hae Mee from scratch, everyone else can definitely do it too! We hope that this step by step recipe would serve as a useful photo guide for all the homesick souls out there who are craving a bowl of prawn noodles! Enjoy :) Continue reading

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Short Recipe: Indonesian Steamed Black Glutinous Rice Cake / Kueh Bolu Ketan Hitam (黒糯米糕)

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I love kueh kueh (or kuih or kue or kway whichever way you spell it). Due to my mother’s good (or bad) influence, since young I’d developed a tongue that is deeply appreciative of Malay, Nonya or Indonesian kueh kueh. While I’m not an expert at making kueh because making kueh is so laborious, I’m glad to say that there are still simple enough kueh recipes for amateurs like me to try. This Indonesian Steamed Black Glutinous Rice Cake, or Kueh Bolu Ketan Hitam, is one of them. There are only a few simple steps and steaming involved, yet the result is a rich, moist and delectable kueh with a taste of home. The only downside is that it doesn’t keep long due to the high egg and coconut milk content… But with a kueh this delicious I don’t think its shelf life needs to be taken into consideration, does it? ;)

P.S. It doesn’t look particularly appetising due to its blacker than death appearance, but don’t be deterred by the charcoal appearance!
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We’re eating… (Slow Cooker) Beef Rendang

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I grew up eating Malay food thanks to my ibu (mother) who was great at making all sorts of curries, sambal udang (sambal prawns), and even kueh kueh. When I came over to the UK, I found myself missing Malay food a great deal. Although the many Malaysian and Indonesian restaurants could readily serve up a nasi lemak or two, what I’d been missing wasn’t just another conventional curry. I craved for ibu‘s Beef Rendang, a special treat, her signature dish that she made very rarely due to the extensive preparation and long hours that went into the dish. I wanted to recreate a taste of her spicy, rich and warming rendang… And perhaps find a way to recreate memories of home as well? :) Continue reading

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Short Recipe: Chwee Kueh (水粿)

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Chwee Kueh are little steamed cakes made from rice flour and water, topped with savoury preserved turnip and a dollop of sambal chilli. They’re steamed in small bowl-like metal containers and form a small “dimple” or well of water in the middle when done (because they’re so soft and moist)! It’s a really popular breakfast item and snack. Fortunately they are also one of the easiest Singaporean/Malaysian delights to make at home because they require so few ingredients that should be readily available at oriental supermarkets. It’s really a godsend to overseas students like us, because it’s one of the easiest ways to cure homesickness!

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We’re trying… Pineapple Tarts (黄梨酥 / 黄梨挞)

So, as you might recall… We made a successful Pineapple Jam for pineapple tarts, commonly deemed to be the most tedious and difficult step in the process. What next? Being the half-ambitious, half-greedy souls we were… We set aside an evening’s time to make the dough for the tarts.
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Short Recipe: Pineapple Jam for Pineapple Tarts (黄梨酥 / 黄梨挞)

66118_532908936742403_733011070_n (1)When it comes to Chinese New Year snacks, the undisputed popularity champion must go to Pineapple Tarts. Almost every ethnic Chinese person I know likes pineapple tarts –  I’d hardly found anyone who dislikes or hates it. And I can understand why – With buttery soft tart bases and moist sweet-sour pineapple jam, pineapple tarts just scream delicious!

Does your family purchase pineapple tarts from suppliers or supermarkets outside, or do your grandmothers, aunts, mothers (and grandfathers, uncles, fathers by all means) make them all at home? I belong to the former and grew up listening to my mother chant “Pineapple tarts are one of the hardest snacks to make”. My mother’s words are definitely not an exaggeration… My greatest respect goes to all who make their own pineapple tarts. Just imagine stirring pineapple jam over the stove over low heat for hours standing, then making a buttery dough so sensitive to touch (butter melts easily when it comes into contact with our human hands), and then finally making enough tubs of them to give away to your relatives (oh those babies, how could you bear to part with them!)

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We’re eating… Fried Nian Gao in Crispy Batter (炸年糕)

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Hello! Just a few days ago at Step-By-Step Recipe: Chinese Steamed Sticky Rice Cake / Nian Gao (年糕) we steamed our own Nian Gao from scratch, so today we’re here to fry these goodies into little parcels of melting calories joy! Why, it’s really quite a versatile delicacy that can be enjoyed steamed, fried or even as a sandwich (more on this later). It’s most commonly pan-fried with a thin coating of beaten eggs – Anybody knows why? In any case at TummyTroll we made a crispy batter that gives the fried goods a nice eggy crunch. No recipe this time as we were not very sure with the proportions, but we’d have provided some sound recipes from other bloggers below! Enjoy photos of the process below:

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